CREED / Scott Stapp Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee 2018

Scott Stapp’s artistic and personal journey have encompassed all the talent and torment imaginable in scaling to musical success. The founding member of Creed chronicled his questions, his quest for answers, and his dreams from faith to fatherhood in chart topping hits, “My Own Prison,” “Higher,” and “With Arms Wide Open,” which dominated the sonic landscape of the 90s-2000s. His soul-piercing lyrics backed by thundering rock riffs garnered a Grammy award, and countless other accolades of creativity and chart domination, not to mention legions of fans, who felt a kindred spirit in his honesty.  Creed has sold over 53 million albums worldwide.

Creed toured extensively through its reign atop rock music, but for Scott, the musical machinery to keep the show going meant some terrible personal cost, as he sunk into depths of depression, and periods of erratic behavior that was later to be revealed as undiagnosed bipolar disorder, prompting self-medication that turned to addictive behaviors. His creativity, passion, and desire to be transparent in his struggle never waned, and were evident on his debut solo album, The Great Divide (2005), the Full Circle album from a “rebirthed” Creed in 2009, several tours, his starkly revealing memoir, Sinner’s Creed (2012), and his highly-acclaimed second solo album, Proof of Life, in 2013, which brought Scott’s first number one song on the Christian charts.

Scott Stapp Website

Creed Website

Jaco Pastorius: (1951-1987) Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee 2018

Fort Lauderdale's Jaco Pastorius, the man who  revolutionized how the bass guitar is played and who is, for many,  the best and most influential bass guitarist that  ever lived. The ascendance of Pastorius in the 1970s was a singular phenomenon  in the evolution of jazz, with an impact that continues to transcend genres and  resonate among his army of disciples 2 decades after his untimely passing. From  the mid '70s to the mid '80s – a relatively short span by most  standards–jaco single-handedly shattered the boundaries of the  electric bass and redefined its potential across all idioms of music.


 There are few musicians who fundamentally change their instrument, and even fewer still who transcend their instrument altogether. Jaco Pastorius did both. In 1976, Jaco’s melodic “singing” bass style redefined the role of the bass in modern music. Almost overnight, critics hailed Jaco Pastorius as “the future of modern music,” alongside popular visionaries like David Bowie, Tom Waits, Patti Smith, Bryan Ferry, Lou Reed, and Herbie Hancock. Driven only by his own desire to create the music he wanted to hear, Jaco transformed himself from a poor and unknown, scrappy Florida boy, into an international sensation — all without any formal musical training. Instead of chasing popular music, Jaco led his fans towards the music inside him. Defiantly jumping off amplifiers, heaving his bass through the air, and refusing to be just a “sideman,” Jaco broke down the barriers between audiences and genres. Unfortunately, for many of our most sensitive artists, great genius comes at great cost… and Jaco Pastorius was no exception. Now over 25plus years since his violent and untimely death, his story will teach the world about true musicianship, family, and the indestructible power of the human spirit. 

  Check out extended BIO and news update on Jaco's WEBSITE: Jaco  Pastorius

The Jaco Pastorius Big Band - FMA Hall of Fame Performing Artists

The Jaco Pastorius Big Band is the life-long project of trombonist/conductor Peter Graves, who first hired Jaco in 1971 to join the rhythm section of what was then known as the Peter Graves Orchestra - the house band at the Bachelors III, a popular Ft. Lauderdale nightclub. The group backed a variety of top jazz and pop acts ranging from Mel Torme and Nancy Wilson to the Temptations and Patti Page.

Graves’ orchestra served as the laboratory in which Jaco first explored the depth and scope of his genius as a writer and arranger. The five-year gig with Graves was also a springboard for Jaco’s later pursuits that included a brilliant solo recording, six years with Weather Report, collaborative projects with various high-profile artists – Joni Mitchell and Pat Metheny to name a few – and his own progressive jazz project, Word of Mouth (which featured Graves and various other members of Graves’ orchestra).

The thirteen tracks on Word of Mouth Revisited span most of Jaco’s prolific and diverse career, from his early compositions and arrangements with Graves’ orchestra ("Punk Jazz" and "Killing Me Softly") to his more progressive forays with Weather Report ("Havona" and "Teen Town") and Word of Mouth ("Continuum," considered by Graves and many others to be Jaco’s signature song). "Wiggle Waggle," one of Jaco’s favorite Herbie Hancock tunes, features Graves’ current lineup playing around a bass track originally recorded by Jaco at a live gig on Sanibel Island in the late 1970s. In many cases, additional arrangements are provided by Larry Warrilow, former guitarist with Graves’ orchestra and Jaco’s longtime friend and collaborator.

Word of Mouth Revisited is possibly the most impressive lineup of bass virtuosity ever assembled to date. Still, the recording is first and foremost about Jaco Pastorius.

"I think people need to get a taste of what Jaco did to really understand what the bass is supposed to be like and what jazz composition is supposed to be like," says Veasley. "He was very daring in his approach to the instrument, and there will never be another one like him."


Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band

with Sam Moore "Soul Man"

 

Sam Moore one of the all-time greatest soul singers was a member of the soul and R&B group Sam & Dave from 1961 to 1981. He is a member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Notable the inspiration for the Blues Brothers.

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Sam Moore of Sam and Dave 'the Soul Man' Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee 2018

 The greatest of all soul duos, Sam (Moore) and Dave (Prater) brought the sound of the black church to pop music with their string of call-and-response hits for Stax Records from 1965 to 1968. The pair usually worked with the songwriting and production team of Isaac Hayes and David Porter, using Booker T. and the M.G.’s as backing musicians. From these collaborations came such soulful, fevered exchanges as “You Don’t Know Like I Know,” “Hold On, I’m Comin’,” “You Got Me Hummin’,” “Soul Man” and “I Thank You.” Sam and Dave also gained renown as an electrifying live act in the Stax revues of the mid-Sixties, where they’d compete for applause with such labelmates as Otis Redding.

Dave Prater was born on May 9, 1937, in Ocilla, Georgia, and Sam Moore was born on October 12, 1935, in Miami, Florida. The duo met in the latter’s hometown in 1961. Moore, a church-reared singer who sang with such gospel quartets as the Gales and the Mellionaires, once turned down an offer to replace the departing Sam Cooke in the Soul Stirrers. Prater had himself moved to Miami to sing in his brother’s gospel group, the Sensational Hummingbirds. But it was R&B that brought the two singers together onstage at Miami’s King of Hearts nightclub one fateful amateur night. Sam and Dave recorded for the Alston and Roulette labels, releasing seven singles, before being discovered by Atlantic Records’ Jerry Wexler, who caught their act at the King of Hearts in 1964. Wexler then sent the duo to Memphis-based Stax to record the next year.

In the spring of 1966, Sam and Dave scored their first major hit, “Hold On, I’m Comin’,” which reached Number One on the R&B chart and Number 21 on the pop chart. Theirs was the perfect balance of pop melody and church feeling; moreover, the duo intuitively played off each other to great effect. Their live shows were among the most exciting of the soul era, with dancers, duel drummers and horns. Despite that, the duo rarely spoke to each other, and in June 1970, Sam and Dave split up. They reunited and parted ways several more times over the years, with the Blues Brothers’ revival of “Soul Man” in 1979 instigating one of their more successful reunions. Never as close offstage as they were in performance, Sam and Dave finally called it quits after a performance in San Francisco on New Year’s Eve, 1981.

Dave Prater was killed in an auto accident on April 9, 1988. Sam Moore has continued to perform as a solo artist. He has also made several appearances in movies, including The Blues Brothers 2000 and Only the Strong Survive. He released his first solo album in 2006, and in October 2009 he appeared at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 25th anniversary concert in New York City, singing “Soul Man” and “Hold On, I’m Comin’” with Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band.

Sam Moore Website

Ed Calle: 2018 Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee


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Dr. Ed Calle Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee 2018

Dr. Ed Calle can be heard on more than 1,200 albums, almost 9,000 singles, and countless movie and television soundtracks both as a soloist, sideman, composer, arranger, conductor, and producer. He appears on Grammy-award-winning albums by Frank Sinatra, Juan Luis Guerra, Arturo Sandoval, Juanes, Vicky Carr, Gloria Estefan, and Jon Secada. Calle has also recorded and performed around the world with music royalty including Phil Ramone, Tom Dowd, Carlos Santana, Eddie Money, Greg Allman, Emilio Estefan, Chick Corea, Michael and Randy Brecker, Tito Puente, Celia Cruz, Poncho Sanchez, Willy Chirino, John Patitucci, Steve Gadd, Donna Summer, the Bee Gees, Natalie Cole, Smokey Robinson, Shakira, The Temptations,The Four Tops, The Spinners, Barry Gibb, Oscar D’Leon, Lenny Kravitz, K.C. & the Sunshine Band, Gloria Estefan, Diego Torres, Julio Iglesias, David Bisbal, Michael Bolton, Will to Power, Luis Enrique, Bob James, Bobby Caldwell, Frankie Valli, Extreme, the Pet Shop Boys, George Clinton, Albita, Placido Domingo, Roberto Carlos, Ricky Martin, Busta Rhyme, JLo, Chayanne, and Vanessa Williams just to name a few.

Calle's television work includes an almost decade-long stint as saxophonist in the Sabado Gigante orchestra and appearances as a
soloist with various artists on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson and Jay Leno, Late Night with David Letterman, the Grammy® Awards, and a host of international, national, and regional television programs and specials. Dr. Ed Calle is a Latin Grammy Award winner for Best Instrumental Album (2015) with Dr. Ed Calle Presents Mamblue and a five-time Grammy nominee. In addition to earning the 2015 Best Instrumental Album Latin Grammy® for Dr. Ed Calle Presents Mamblue, Calle also garnered a 2014 Latin Grammy nomination and 2015 Grammy nomination as a member of the Afro-Cuban Funk Super group PALO for their album PALO! Live. Among his many solo recordings, Ed Calle Plays Santana earned a Latin Grammy® nomination in 2005. In the Zone features original jazz compositions and jazz standards and earned a Latin Grammy nomination in 2007. His 2015 Latin Grammy winning solo release Dr. Ed Calle Presents Mamblue, is an Afro-Cuban jazz orchestral spectacular featuring more than 115 of the most influential jazz and studio musicians in the history of South Florida. The first studiorecord by the World Music 5, America, features chamber jazz orchestrations of original and classic music from the Americas with an allstar quintet that includes Negroni’s Trio and violinist Federico Britos. Exploring the duo realm with his longtime friend and colleague Jose Negroni, Calle is also featured on the Latin Grammy Award nominated 2015 Sony Records release Negroni +9. website: edcalle.com
Ed Calle Website

Miami Herald Article on Ed Calle

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Peter Graves: Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee 2018

The greatest of all soul duos, Sam (Moore) and Dave (Prater) brought the sound of the black church to pop music with their string of call-and-response hits for Stax Records from 1965 to 1968. The pair usually worked with the songwriting and production team of Isaac Hayes and David Porter, using Booker T. and the M.G.’s as backing musicians. From these collaborations came such soulful, fevered exchanges as “You Don’t Know Like I Know,” “Hold On, I’m Comin’,” “You Got Me Hummin’,” “Soul Man” and “I Thank You.” Sam and Dave also gained renown as an electrifying live act in the Stax revues of the mid-Sixties, where they’d compete for applause with such labelmates as Otis Redding.

Dave Prater was born on May 9, 1937, in Ocilla, Georgia, and Sam Moore was born on October 12, 1935, in Miami, Florida. The duo met in the latter’s hometown in 1961. Moore, a church-reared singer who sang with such gospel quartets as the Gales and the Mellionaires, once turned down an offer to replace the departing Sam Cooke in the Soul Stirrers. Prater had himself moved to Miami to sing in his brother’s gospel group, the Sensational Hummingbirds. But it was R&B that brought the two singers together onstage at Miami’s King of Hearts nightclub one fateful amateur night. Sam and Dave recorded for the Alston and Roulette labels, releasing seven singles, before being discovered by Atlantic Records’ Jerry Wexler, who caught their act at the King of Hearts in 1964. Wexler then sent the duo to Memphis-based Stax to record the next year.

In the spring of 1966, Sam and Dave scored their first major hit, “Hold On, I’m Comin’,” which reached Number One on the R&B chart and Number 21 on the pop chart. Theirs was the perfect balance of pop melody and church feeling; moreover, the duo intuitively played off each other to great effect. Their live shows were among the most exciting of the soul era, with dancers, duel drummers and horns. Despite that, the duo rarely spoke to each other, and in June 1970, Sam and Dave split up. They reunited and parted ways several more times over the years, with the Blues Brothers’ revival of “Soul Man” in 1979 instigating one of their more successful reunions. Never as close offstage as they were in performance, Sam and Dave finally called it quits after a performance in San Francisco on New Year’s Eve, 1981.

Dave Prater was killed in an auto accident on April 9, 1988. Sam Moore has continued to perform as a solo artist. He has also made several appearances in movies, including The Blues Brothers 2000 and Only the Strong Survive. He released his first solo album in 2006, and in October 2009 he appeared at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 25th anniversary concert in New York City, singing “Soul Man” and “Hold On, I’m Comin’” with Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. 

Mike Pinera: Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee 2018

Blues Image, Iron Butterfly, Cactus, Guitarist for Alice Cooper and more.

Mike Pinera founded Blues Image in Tampa in 1966. Blues Image moved to Miami in 1968, where they were instrumental in helping promoters form the most innovative music venue in South Florida, 'Thee Image'. The rich in talent Blues Image became the house band at the club, which featured bands like Cream, Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Paige, Blood, Sweat and Tears… 

In the summer of 1970, Pinera wrote, sang, and recorded for the world the classic rock hit “Ride Captain Ride”, after being highly pressured to write a hit song or the band faced dire circumstances. The song rode to the top of the charts and has remained popular since. However, shortly after their commercial success the band drifted apart and went on to new projects. 

The highly talented members of Blues Image went on to become parts of other major rock bands. Manuel "Manny" Bertematti later played and recorded with New Cactus Band and toured with Iron Butterfly, Chi Coltrane, and Bobby Womack. Konte joined Three Dog Night, and Joe Lala played with Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. Lala's percussion work also figures prominently on the Stephen Stills/Chris Hillman led group, Manassas. Kent Henry played lead guitar with Steppenwolf prior to their break-up in 1972. 


 Pinera left Blues Image to become lead singer of the psychedelic rock group Iron Butterfly, along with his prominent guitar he had instant fame riding this time with a global hit “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.” More hits would follow for Pinera and company as the stage became larger. Artist’s such as Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin catapulted their fame as opening acts for Iron Butterfly. Pinera was at the epicenter and pinnacle of the music world--sharing in the association royalty of rock artists during this dynamic era of pop culture. Other notable Pinera feats include being lead guitarist for Alice Cooper from 1980 to 1982, and the famed Guitar Duel Of the Century with Ted Nugent--who remains one of his best friends. He also recorded multiple solo albums and charted with the single “Goodnight My Love.” Most recently he founded the Classic Rock All-Stars, a nostalgia-driven live attraction of notable musicians that are playing their history of classic rock staples to large appreciative audiences throughout America these days. 

New Found Glory AKA NFG: Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductees 2018

BIO by Jason Ankeny - ALL MUSIC
Hailing from Coral Springs, Florida, punk-pop band New Found Glory were formed in mid-1997 by vocalist Jordan Pundik, bassist Ian Grushka, drummer Joe Moreno (replaced by longtime drummer Cyrus Bolooki after the band's first release), and guitarists Chad Gilbert (previously the vocalist for Shai Hulud) and Steve Klein. Having recently graduated from high school, the bandmates wasted little time amassing a cult following, eventually rising to the upper tier of punk-pop music alongside Good Charlotte, Saves the Day, and other Warped Tour-affiliated bands.

Renowned for their energetic live shows, A New Found Glory toured up and down the East Coast in the late '90s, selling out the entire pressing of their 1997 debut EP, It's All About the Girls, along the way. (The EP was released by Fiddler Records, which later reissued Girls with new cover art in 2003.) The full-length debut effort Nothing Gold Can Stay followed in 1999 on Drive -Thru Records, and the album was reissued later that year when A New Found Glory signed a major-label contract with MCA. Another EP, 2000's From the Screen to Your Stereo, found the boys tackling a number of cover songs; the disc also paved the way for the release of the band's first gold-selling album, the self-titled New Found Glory, which appeared later that year. The latter album marked the official debut of the band's new moniker, which dropped the indefinite article A from their original name.

A high-profile tour with blink-182, an opening slot on the Warped Tour, and an appearance in the teen flick American Pie 2 helped increase New Found Glory's exposure, and they stepped back into the studio at the end of 2001 to work on a follow-up record.

The results of those recording sessions were released in the summer of 2002 as Sticks and Stones. Propelled by the hit single "My Friends Over You," New Found Glory snagged a headlining spot for the 2002 Warped Tour and watched their album climb to gold certification. After the tour and its resulting hype, the band then reentered the studio with a newfound restlessness. The result, issued in May 2004, was Catalyst, which found their sugary punk-pop steeped in new influences ranging from hardcore to thrash to new wave. The concert DVD This Disaster: Live in London appeared later that year, documenting the band's strength as a live act.

Catalyst peaked at number three on Billboard's Top 200 and eventually went gold, propelled in part by the success of "All Downhill from Here." Hooking up with producer Thom Panunzio (Ozzy Osbourne, Tom Petty), New Found Glory released their mature fifth full-length, Coming Home, in September 2006. As before, they immediately hit the road in support of the album, adhering to a lengthy schedule of headlining dates throughout the U.S. and U.K. with the Early November and Cartel in tow. The second edition of From the Screen to Your Stereo arrived in 2007, featuring pop-punk covers of songs like Lisa Loeb's "Stay" and Simple Minds' "Don't You Forget About Me." The group then joined the roster at Epitaph Records and set to work on a new album, Not Without a Fight, with blink-182's Mark Hoppus in the producer's seat. Two years later, New Found Glory went back to working with producer Neal Avron, who had worked with them on Sticks and Stones and Catalyst, for their seventh album, Radiosurgery.

Kill It Live, a live album that also featured a trio of new studio tracks, arrived in 2013. Also in 2013, the band parted ways with guitarist Klein after he was charged with several counts of lewd acts with underage girls. However, rather than replace Klein, the remaining bandmembers decided to continue on as a four-piece with Gilbert handling all the guitar duties. In 2014, the four-member New Found Glory delivered Resurrection, which found them diving into their punk roots with a renewed sense of purpose. The album was re-released in 2015 as Resurrection: Ascension, featuring two new studio tracks and a reworked version of "Vicious" with Paramore's Hayley Williams. In 2017, New Found Glory celebrated their 20th anniversary with the release of their ninth album, Makes Me Sick, and a tour during which they would play several of their best-loved albums in their entireties. Makes Me Sick featured the singles "Happy Being Miserable" and "Party on Apocalypse."

Website: newfoundglory.com

NFG VIDEOS:

Dana Paul: Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee 2017-Vocalist for 2018 Show

Dana’s vocal wizardry and electric personality have made him one of the most admired performers on the Florida scene and beyond for decades. His energetic style takes audiences to places that are rare indeed. Dana’s incredible vocals have fronted several Florida bands throughout the years. Notable the Peter Graves Orchestra, the Dana Paul band, the Sunrise Pops and the Jaco Pastorius band.

Dana Paul Official Website

David Frangioni: Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductee 2018

David Frangioni is an entrepreneur, an award-winning music technologist, producer, engineer and drummer, VP of Entertainment & Digital Media for Klique, CEO of Audio One and IDA. David is considered a pioneer in the surround sound world and he co-produced / engineered the first 5.1 digital surround sound music mixes ever on CD for DTS in 1995. Frangioni is the recipient of dozens of gold and platinum albums as technical consultant, engineer, and/or programmer since 1987. His credits include the Stones, Ringo Starr, Elton John, Sting, Bryan Adams, Journey, Styx, Shakira, Rascal Flatts, Aerosmith, Ozzy Osbourne, Cher and hundreds more. David is the chief technologist for the group Aerosmith. He has built their personal recording studios and high-end A/V systems. He served as their in-house engineer for the records "Get a Grip," "Big Ones," "South of Sanity," "Nine Lives” & “Just Push Play."

David gained worldwide notoriety as the official technologist for "The Osbournes" and appeared in multiple episodes of their hit MTV show. David's first book, "Clint Eastwood: ICON" published by Insight Editions was released worldwide & the proceeds go to Clint Eastwood’s charity. David has 2 new books being released in 2018. David’s philanthropy extends to having been on the Board for the Little Dreams Foundation with Orianne & Phil Collins and Romero Britto, whereby he also served as Musical Director until 2016. In 2011, the Inspire & Develop Artists Program (IDA Program) was launched to help aspiring artists realize their dreams and goals, it’s been described as “Tony Robbins meets American Idol” having served over 100 artists. David brings his cutting edge vision to the app Klique as well as Frangioni Foundation, his non-profit mission helping children in need through music, mentoring and drumming.

Florida Music Awards Hall of Fame Inductees: Ray Charles, Bo Diddley, Rick Derringer, Bertie Higgins. 

 FMA Humanitarian Award Recipient: Burt Reynolds   -  Dana Paul (FMA Hall of Fame Regional artists)